Adding an Image to a Click to Tweet - Video Tutorial

A one-click, pre-written tweet is a great way to get people to share your content directly from your blog posts. Research shows that adding an image to a tweet can significantly increase any subsequent engagement or retweets.

Today's video tutorial will show you how easy it is to find the specific url you need from Twitter to allow you to do this. It's tucked away in the tweet's code, but it is actually easy to find and add to your click-to-tweet message.

 

 
Today's video tutorial will show you how easy it is to find the specific url you need from Twitter to allow you to do this. It's tucked away in the tweet's code, but it is actually easy to find and add to your click-to-tweet message.
 

 

Why Does Adding an Image to a Click to Tweet Make a Difference?

Following Twitter's evolution from simple 140-character tweets to a more visually-enticing feed — thanks, I'm sure, to the huge surge in popularity of Pinterest and Instagram — research has shown that adding images can substantially increase engagement, retweets and click throughs (source Jeff Bullas, 2015):

  • 18% more click throughs
  • 89% more favourites
  • 150% more retweets

So yes, 'Visual Tweeting' can certainly make a difference.

But, is adding an image to your tweets a good use of your time? Just maintaining a consistent social media stream can be time-consuming enough.

Luckily, creating a click to tweet enhanced with visuals is quick, easy and a good longer-term investment:

  • you create the tweet once;
  • adding an image url is surprisingly easy, as you will see below; and
  • the tweet can then be used over and over again.

Video Tutorial

This video will show you:

  • how to create the unique image url via Twitter;
  • how to find the url once it has been created;
  • how to add it to a click to tweet; and
  • what you can expect to see when the tweet is used.

 

 

The How To: Adding an Image to a Click to Tweet

  1. Tweet the Image to your own account once.
  2. Go to your Twitter feed and find that Tweet. Click on the More button (the 3 little dots under the image) and select Embed Tweet.
  3. With the Include Media checked, Copy the Embed Code and paste into a blank document.
  4. Search the code to find a url beginning with: pic.twitter.com/...  Copy this url and include it in the text of your click-to-tweet.

That's it. That tiny url is all you need to add images to your click to tweets.

It is essential that you tweet the image once to your own Twitter feed at the start. You need to do this so that Twitter can create its own unique url for that image (i.e. where that images lives in your images/video section of your Twitter account). You can't create this link yourself by just uploading an image to your own website. It is a Twitter-specific url.

Don't be put off by all the code! You just need to scan through for the pic.twitter link and ignore the rest.

You could skip the pasting-into-a-blank-document part and just search through the embed code to find the link and write it down. The code is quite long, though, and is displayed in a tiny box. I've found the copy/paste technique a quick and easy way to do it.

You can see that, with a little practice, this is a surprisingly quick way to make your tweets stand out in the Twitter feed. And, the effort will go on working for you long after the post has gone live.

I am now creating Twitter-friendly images (1024px x 512px) each time I create my blog post images, so it is ready to tweet out when the post goes live. I'm finding creating all the images I need for a post at the same time a great time saver.

Perhaps you could go back through some of your older, more viewed posts and update the click to tweet to see if an image increases retweets or engagement?